NAARB - Serving the U.S. and Canada Since 1947

Home » Archive

Why Don’t We Take Five Minutes? II. Panel Discussion

The panel members discuss hypotheticals and their actual experiences when engaging in the med-arb process.

Read more

The article defines “med-arb,” describes its various forms, and what is required to make the process work effectively

Read more

The pitfalls of med-arb are described; ways to avoid them recommended; and the process described. The med-arb contract is discussed and sample provisions offered

Read more

The author, Chair of the Ontario Labour Relations Board, relates that, in Ontario, a med-arb approach to grievances has proven effective, and that counsels have adapted to its use.

Read more

Attorney Hayes describes the advantages and disadvantages of grievance mediation, and the success of med-arb, from his perspective as an attorney practicing in Ontario, Canada.

Read more

The author discusses current issues in interest arbitration, including the allocation of increasing health insurance costs, comparability criteria, retiree benefits, he use of med-arb, and the interest arbitration criteria that may pertain under the Employee Free Choice Act, should it become law.

Read more

Mediating grievances

The risks and benefits of grievance mediation are explored, as are practical and ethical considerations. AT&T’s (southern region) experience with mediation is described and statistics furnished.

Read more

Unique problems and opportunities of permanent umpireships: A panel discussion

The advantages and disadvantages – for the arbitrators and for the parties – of permanent umpire relationships. The historical genesis of such relationships is discussed; umpireships and ad hoc arbitrations are compared; and some of the authors’ memorable umpireships are described.

Read more

Interest arbitration in Canada is sufficiently similar to that in the U.S. so as not to warrant lengthy description. The author instead describes and comments on mediation combined with arbitration, as practiced in some major labor-management relationships in Canada. Her observations include the qualities that a mediator-arbitrator should possess.

Read more

Professor Gershenfeld’s observations about interest arbitration. He examines the criteria for making monetary decisions, scope problems in the non-monetary areas, the “coercive comparison,” and the role of “public interest” factors (e.g., the effect of a settlement in one part of an organization on other upcoming bargains in the same organization). The “arb-med tool” is discussed.

Read more
Page 1 of 2 12